Phentermine NLBHA - The National Latino Behavioral Health Association - Latest News

 

New Report by NCLR Titled "Mental Health Services for Latino Youth: Bridging Culture and Evidence"

The mental health of young people in America is key to our nation’s future success and prosperity: healthy, confident, hopeful youth can more easily find the path to academic, social, economic, and civic well-being. Today’s generation of young people, however, is coming of age during a period of social uncertainty and upheaval that may threaten their sense of safety and stability in the world. A range of pressures, including heightened economic inequality, increased financial burdens, and a reduced job market, have made today’s millennials “America’s most stressed generation” according to the American Psychological Association. For poor youth of color, additional environmental strains such as poverty, unsafe neighborhoods, and chronic racial/ethnic discrimination, among other social determinants of health, can significantly increase distress and their overall mental and emotional well-being.

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Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health

On Thursday, November 17, 2016, the U.S. Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy published a landmark report on a health crisis affecting every community in our country. Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health is a comprehensive review of the science of substance use, misuse, and disorders. The report is available online at https://addiction.surgeongeneral.gov.

NEARLY 21 MILLION PEOPLE IN AMERICA HAVE A SUBSTANCE USE DISORDER involving alcohol or drugs, an astonishing figure that is COMPARABLE TO THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE IN OUR COUNTRY WITH DIABETES AND HIGHER THAN THE TOTAL NUMBER OF AMERICANS SUFFERING FROM ALL CANCERS COMBINED. But in spite of the massive scope of this problem, ONLY 1 IN 10 PEOPLE WITH A SUBSTANCE USE DISORDER RECEIVES TREATMENT.

The societal cost of alcohol misuse is $249 billion, and for illicit drug use it is $193 billion. What we cannot quantify is the human toll on individuals, families, and communities affected not only by addiction, but also by alcohol and drug-related crime, violence, abuse, and child neglect.

Though this challenge is daunting, there is much reason to be hopeful. That’s because we know how to solve the problem. We know that prevention works, treatment is effective, and recovery is possible for everyone. We know that we cannot incarcerate our way out of this situation; instead, we need to apply an evidence-based public health approach that brings together all sectors of our society to end this crisis. And we know that addiction is not a moral failing. It is a chronic illness that must be treated with skill, urgency, and compassion.

To mark the launch of the report, the Office of the Surgeon General and the Facing Addiction coalition hosted “Facing Addiction in America, A National Summit.” Please view the podcast of this event from the Paramount Theatre in Los Angeles. The event featured a series of conversations with individuals affected by the crisis, experts in the field, and leaders who are making a difference.

Previous reports of the Surgeon General, including those on tobacco (1964), AIDS (1987), and mental health (1999), have helped to create understanding and urgency to address critical public health challenges. Building on this heritage, The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health will equip clinicians, policymakers, law enforcement, community leaders, and families with the evidence and tools they need to take action.

Together, we can prevent addiction and create hope for millions of people in treatment and recovery. When we stop judging, we can start helping.

#MentalHealthReform

Mental illness is still being denied by insurers at more than 2 times the rate of physical illness. People aren’t getting the mental health care they need when they need it.

Mental Health Reform, S. 2680, will help. But, time is running out.

Take 2 minutes on Tuesday, November 15th. Call your Senators. Tell them to demand a vote on S. 2680 now.

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SAMHSA's Minority Fellowship Program accepting fellowship applications for 2017-18

SAMHSA's Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) grantees have started to accept fellowship applications for the 2017-18 academic cycle. The MFP seeks to improve behavioral health outcomes of racially and ethnically diverse populations by increasing the number of well - trained, culturally-competent, behavioral health professionals available to work in underserved, minority communities. The program offers scholarship assistance, training, and mentoring for individuals seeking degrees in behavioral health who meet program eligibility requirements.

For more information and to apply for each program, please click each individual program link above.

OMH and SAMHSA MyMentalHealth Twitter Chat

The Office of Minority Health along with SAMSHA is hosting a #MyMentalHealth Twitter chat to coincide with National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month on July 27th at 2 pm ET. This chat will bring together partners from various backgrounds and agencies to discuss mental health in minority communities.

Mental health impacts all of us in various ways and we want to hear your voice in this important discussion. Please consider joining the Twitter chat as a partner, helping us promote the event on social media and sharing your work, content and resources during the chat. Attached to this email you will find promotional content and the questions that will be asked during the chat. Also, if you're not able to attend the chat please feel free to schedule tweets as we have included the times when each question is expected to go out.

To sign on as a partner or get more information, please feel free to contact Shana Griffith at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Thank you for your support! #MyMentalHealth.